EVENT: Symposium on Academic Publishing and the Futures of Research

Image taken from page 213 of 'Queen Mab. A novel'
The Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine (VELiM) is hosting an event on the academic publishing industry and the commercialization of knowledge production.

In recent years there has been a lot of self-reflection about the effects of neoliberalism on the university and the practices of teaching and research. This symposium will focus on academic publishing and the impacts of paywalls on academic practices, but also democratic access to knowledge required for policy-making and informed public debate.

Speaking to The Guardian, Dr Claire Hooker outlined some of the concerns associated with current academic publishing practice, saying:

There are people out there who are worried about the effects of medicines, or who want to know more about the evidence informing the health policies that affect them, but they can’t find the answers because they hit a paywall.

Professor Paul Komesaroff (Monash), who will also be part of the symposium, argues that more open and democratic models of publishing are needed. According to Komesaroff, scholars are looking for these models. However, it appears that the current institutional arrangements and intensives make it difficult to imagine alternatives.

The symposium looks to explores some of these alternatives. For more information see the below.

Reclaiming the Knowledge Commons
The Ethics of Academic Publishing and the Futures of Research

Type: Seminar
Date: Wednesday 26 August 2015
Time: 9.00 AM to 4.00 PM
Venue: State Library, Mitchell Wing
Cost: Free
Click here to book

Speakers include: Emeritus Professor Stephen Leeder, Professor Paul Komesaroff, Associate Professor Andrew Bonnell, Dr John Byron, JoAnne Sparks, Dr Virginia Barbour, Rosalia Garcia (SAGE), and Professor Christopher Wright.
Chair: Dr Claire Hooker

The symposium will comprise four sessions:

  • 9:00-10:30 Session 1: Corporatization and the commercialization of knowledge
  • 11:00-12:00 Session 2: Democratizing knowledge or selling the farm? The emergence and challenges of ‘Open Access’
  • 12:00-1:00 Session 3:  Dissolving barriers – and boundaries: Scholars and the possibilities of the new digital knowledge commons
  • 2:00-4:00 Session 4: Taking up the challenge of ethical academic publication

Catering is provided

For more information please contact;
Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine
T +61 410 161841 | E velim.event@sydney.edu.au

There’s more to Pradaxa’s problems than meets the eye

By Wendy Lipworth, University of Sydney and Ian Kerridge, University of Sydney

Pharmaceutical companies don’t have a particularly good reputation, for some very good reasons. But we can’t let suspicions about the motives of such companies cloud our assessments of drug safety because patients may also suffer.

People with abnormal heart rhythms and other diseases that cause blood clots (thromboses) often require blood-thinning (anticoagulation) medications. For many decades, warfarin has been the most widely used such drug but it’s associated with a risk of bleeding (including fatal haemorrhage) and requires regular blood tests to monitor safety and efficacy.

So the advent of new oral anticoagulant drugs was heralded as a major advance by both patients and clinicians – principally on the grounds that they appeared as effective as warfarin, may be associated with a lower risk of serious bleeding, and are cost-effective because patients don’t need ongoing blood monitoring.

For these reasons, a number of these new drugs, including dabigatran (Pradaxa) and rivaroxaban (Xarelto) were fast-tracked through the regulatory approval processes in the United States and in New Zealand. Continue reading